the barnacle is my totem

things i see that i like

I wonder if the three of us would’ve been friends in real life. Not as brothers, but as people.

(Source: llilyrabe, via adogsbreakfast)

illustratedvancouver:

On Saturday, April 5, Keith McKellar aka Laughing Hand opened a one man show at the Interurban Art Gallery in Vancouver. The gallery walls were filled with his large formats drawings, meticulously coloured and vibrantly printed, displaying some of the most characteristic establishments ever seen in downtown Vancouver. Many of these drawings were originally conceived for his 2001 book, Neon Eulogy, but in most cases, the drawings have been completely reworked, applying more than a decade of refined technique and skill to bring these scenes to life.

Not everyone can afford to bring home and install a neon sign in their living room, but it is far more feasible to bring home one of these works of art. Highly recommended! The show runs until April 29, 2014.

jackandjackie:

Another powerful ethic that Dad taught us was to respect the privacy of others and to ignore whatever disrespect of privacy might come our way. I learned this particular lesson at a birthday party for myself in about 1946. At some point in the afternoon I wandered upstairs - to use the bathroom, I think. I passed a bedroom and heard a boy’s voice. I looked in and saw Lafay Paige, one of the young party guests, talking on the phone, to one of his parents. His back was partly turned and he couldn’t see me. Lafay was saying, “I hope this party gets over pretty quick because it’s really dull and we’re not having much fun at all. It’s really drab, so will you come and get me?” I stood there sort of paralyzed and embarrassed that the boy felt my party was dull.
Then I heard footsteps behind me. My father had just walked out of the master bedroom and spotted me listening to the telephone conversation He quietly told me to come back with him into his bedroom. I thought maybe he was going to console me, but he had another topic entirely on his mind. He said, “Teddy, let me give you some advice. Follow it, and you’ll be much happier the rest of your life.”

”Never listen to a phone call that isn’t meant for you. Never read a letter that isn’t meant for you. Never pay attention to a comment that isn’t meant for you. Never violate people’s privacy. You will save yourself a great deal of anguish. You might not understand this now, but you will later on.”

— True Compass, Ted Kennedy

jackandjackie:

Another powerful ethic that Dad taught us was to respect the privacy of others and to ignore whatever disrespect of privacy might come our way. I learned this particular lesson at a birthday party for myself in about 1946. At some point in the afternoon I wandered upstairs - to use the bathroom, I think. I passed a bedroom and heard a boy’s voice. I looked in and saw Lafay Paige, one of the young party guests, talking on the phone, to one of his parents. His back was partly turned and he couldn’t see me. Lafay was saying, “I hope this party gets over pretty quick because it’s really dull and we’re not having much fun at all. It’s really drab, so will you come and get me?” I stood there sort of paralyzed and embarrassed that the boy felt my party was dull.

Then I heard footsteps behind me. My father had just walked out of the master bedroom and spotted me listening to the telephone conversation He quietly told me to come back with him into his bedroom. I thought maybe he was going to console me, but he had another topic entirely on his mind. He said, “Teddy, let me give you some advice. Follow it, and you’ll be much happier the rest of your life.”

”Never listen to a phone call that isn’t meant for you. Never read a letter that isn’t meant for you. Never pay attention to a comment that isn’t meant for you. Never violate people’s privacy. You will save yourself a great deal of anguish. You might not understand this now, but you will later on.”

— True Compass, Ted Kennedy

mooseings:

bicklandia:

Here in Australia, this is what has been happening over the past few days. The media is largely ignoring it, despite it being one of the largest protests in this country’s history. My state has also just passed laws that will come into effect in September that put restrictions on protesting which could lead to two years imprisonment. Our Prime Minister won’t even acknowledge that this has been happening.

Reblog this!

Please get this circulating. Australian media refuses to cover it and the government is pretending it didn’t happen even though there were people on their doorsteps at Parliament house. People in Australia are discontented with the way asylum seekers are treated like criminals, indigenous people are still being treated horribly, that our prime minister is a racist, sexist, homophobe who appointed himself as Minister for Women, that our health care is threatened, that our environment is being treated as a commodity, that our university funding is being cut, and that our Prime Minister doesn’t “believe” in climate change and that this country now only caters to the rich and conservative. And that barely scratches the surface.

What this government does is not in our name and we need to get the message out there, loud and clear.

(via adogsbreakfast)